IAQ Services

11236 Harrington St

Fishers, Indiana 46038

(317) 598-0148

(800) 862-9655

www.IndoorAirSite.com

 

Homeowner  

28 Harrington Ln.

Someplace, Mississippi 39507

 

Friday, September 29, 2006

 

Re:  Indoor Environmental Quality Assessment of the Homeowner’ Residence

            

Dear  Homeowner:

 

This is a report on the indoor environmental quality (IAQ) of your home, post-Hurricane Katrina, located at 2005 Harrington Ln, Someplace, Mississippi 39507. 

 

Summary

 

Observations

The home was tested and inspected...  It was observed...

 

See pictures.

Homeowner Home

July 25, 2006

 

 

Front of Damaged Home

Roof Damage

 

Moldy Garage Wall

Lower Level Floor Deck and Joists are Moldy

 


 

Upstairs door has a faint water mark

at one about foot above floor

Wind and Rainwater Damage to the Attic

and Ceiling above Master Bedroom

Great Room Roof Gable, 2nd Fl. (Severe Damage)

Master Bedroom Ceiling, 2nd Fl. (Severe Damage) Roof Projectile Penetration and Damage

Moldy Appearance of Joist in

the Great Room, 2nd Floor, severe roof damage

Water-Stained & Moldy

Ceiling in Master Bedroom, 2nd Floor

Testing as a Means of Assessing Indoor Environmental Quality

A table summarizing results follows.

 

Summary of Test Results

Homeowner Home

July 25, 2006

Location

Sample Type

Sample ID

Analysis

Results

Finding

Outdoor Air

air

7263

Airborne Fungal Spores

26,000 spores /m3

normal-high range for outdoor air in mid-summer in Mississippi[1]

Den, First Floor at Fireplace

air

7294

Airborne Fungal Spores

59,000 spores /m3

Elevated fungal counts, exceeds outdoor air, water-damage fungi present in high concentrations, Aspergillus-Penicillium, Trichoderma, Stachybotrys sp. present, fungal growth indicated

Master Bedroom

air

7821

Airborne Fungal Spores

45,000 spores /m3

Elevated fungal counts, exceeds outdoor air, water-damage fungi present in high concentrations Trichoderma, Stachybotrys sp. present, fungal growth indicated

Garage Wood Panel, 4' High

surface

SW1

Viable Surface Fungal Spores

High Rhodotorula (yeast), Exophiala

  Total Fungal Growth at  610,000 cfu/in2

Presently viable fungi, Extremely concentrated fungal growth is a result of wet building materials

Garage Wall-Cross Brace

surface

T1

Surface Fungal Spores

High Aspergillus-Penicillium and Trichoderma present, fungal growth observed

Extremely concentrated fungal growth is a result of previously wet building materials

Second Floor Deck above stairs

surface

T2

Surface Fungal Spores

Medium Trichoderma, Asp-Pen, Yeasts, fungal growth observed

Extremely concentrated fungal growth is a result of previously wet building materials

Great Room, Wall Stud

surface

T3

Surface Fungal Spores

High Cladosporium,  fungal growth observed

Extremely concentrated fungal growth is a result of previously wet building materials

Second Floor Ceiling above Stairs

surface

T4

Surface Fungal Spores

High Asp-Pen fungal growth observed

Extremely concentrated fungal growth is a result of previously wet building materials

Great Room, Support Joist Over Doorway

surface

T5

Surface Fungal Spores

Trace  of unknown fungi, result is likely an anomaly due to the still damp surface (leaking tarp)

Surface was moist which likely resulted in undersampling of fungal growth (e.g.: on sticky tape)

Master Bedroom, Ceiling Deck over Doorway

surface

T6

Surface Fungal Spores

High Cladosporium,  fungal growth observed

Extremely concentrated fungal growth is a result of previously wet building materials

 

Indoor Air Sampling

Airborne spore counts ...

 

Surface Sampling

Numerous surfaces were sampled within the home ...

 

 

Discussion

There were numerous surface and air samples taken in the home. ...

 

About IAQ Services Inc.

IAQ Services is a full service consulting firm in the areas of environmental health and safety testing and remediation.  Stuart Bagley is a consultant from IAQ Services Inc.  He is a Certified Industrial Hygienist (CIH) and a Certified Safety Professional (CSP).  He has a Master of Science degree in Occupational and Environmental Health from Wayne State University and a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology from the University of Michigan.  Mr. Bagley’s field experience includes serving as a Compliance Safety and Health Officer for US Dept. of Labor-Occupational Safety and Health Admin (OSHA), working in corporate safety management, and as a senior consultant for IAQ Services, a total of 24 years.  He has conducted numerous indoor environmental quality investigations.

 

To the Homeowner family, thank you for your assistance during this vital work in your home.

 

Sincerely,

 

Stuart D Bagley

 

Stuart D. Bagley, MS, CIH, CSP

Attachments:  lab reports, pictures


Appendix

 

Abbreviated Table 2: US EPA Guidelines for Remediating Building Materials with Mold Growth Caused by Clean Water  http://www.epa.gov/mold/table2.html

Material or Furnishing Affected 

Cleanup Methods†

Personal Protective Equipment

Containment

LARGE - Total Surface Area Affected Greater Than 100 (ft2) or Potential for 
Increased Occupant or Remediator Exposure During Remediation  Estimated to be Significant

Books and papers  

3

Full

Use professional judgment, consider potential for remediator/occupant exposure and size of contaminated area

 

Full

Use professional judgment, consider potential for remediator exposure and size of contaminated area

 

Carpet and backing 

1,3,4

Concrete or cinder block

1,3

Hard surface, porous flooring (linoleum, ceramic tile, vinyl) 

1,2,3,4

Non-porous, hard surfaces (plastics, metals) 

1,2,3

Upholstered furniture & drapes 

1,2,4

Wallboard (drywall and gypsum board) 

3,4

Wood surfaces 

1,2,3,4


Cleanup Methods

  • Method 1: Wet vacuum (in the case of porous materials, some mold spores/fragments will remain in the material but will not grow if the material is completely dried). Steam cleaning may be an alternative for carpets and some upholstered furniture.
  • Method 2: Damp-wipe surfaces with plain water or with water and detergent solution (except wood —use wood floor cleaner); scrub as needed.
  • Method 3: High-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) vacuum after the material has been thoroughly dried. Dispose of the contents of the HEPA vacuum in well-sealed plastic bags.
  • Method 4: Discard - remove water-damage materials and seal in plastic bags while inside of containment, if present. Dispose of as normal waste. HEPA vacuum area after it is dried.

 


1 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (AAAAI), www.AAAAI.org, 2006, 13000 - 49999 (sp/m3) High, >50000 Very High, © 1996-2006 · All Rights Reserved · American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology

 2 High, Medium, Low: Structures covering >50%, 10-50%, <10% of the areas examined, respectively.

3,4 "Mold Remediation in Schools and Commercial Buildings", Investigating, Evaluating, and Remediating Moisture and Mold Problems, United States Environmental Protection Agency Office of Air and Radiation, Indoor Environments Division (6609-J) EPA 402-K-01-001, March 2001